Tag Archives: simulation


How You Train is How You Fight

Simulation makes us more effective. I think it’s good to consider how one would deal with emergency situations in every day life, and practice the response. There are ALWAYS learning points.

My four year old son Kal brought along his rubber red bellied black snake on a New Year’s Day bush walk with my family. Too good an opportunity to miss, so we practiced managing a snakebite scenario. What we did and what we learned are summarised in this three minute video:

 
This was a worthwhile exercise. Learning points were:

1. Carry a knife to help cut up the teeshirt (if you don’t carry bandages)

2. Call for help early – it takes several minutes to apply the pressure immobilisation bandage, so ideally these things are done in parallel rather than series.

3. Know how to get your coordinates from your smart phone. Several free apps are available.
On an Apple iPhone, they are displayed on the ‘Compass’ app but ONLY if you have enabled location services (Settings->Privacy->Location Services->Compass)

location services compass-10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more about pressure immobilisation technique and its indications from the Australian Resuscitation Council

Even the dead exhale CO2

cadaverETCO2iconCardiac arrest patients sometimes have unrecognised oesophageal intubations because clinicians omit capnography, based on the assumption that circulatory arrest leads to an absence of exhaled CO2. This is wrong, and reassuringly the latest ILCOR cardiac arrest guidelines recommend waveform capnography during resuscitation.

Of interest is the fact that even corpses have CO2 in their lungs. While not clinically relevant, this may have value when fresh frozen cadavers are used for airway training, since we might be able to supplement the realism of airway instrumentation with the realism of connecting the capnography adaptor and circuit and seeing confirmation on the monitor.

This preliminary study, completed by my Sydney HEMS colleagues, needs further work, but it’s an interesting area.

Sustained life-like waveform capnography after human cadaveric tracheal intubation
Emerg Med J doi:10.1136/emermed-2013-203105


Introduction Fresh frozen cadavers are effective training models for airway management. We hypothesised that residual carbon dioxide (CO2) in cadaveric lung would be detectable using standard clinical monitoring systems, facilitating detection of tracheal tube placement and further enhancing the fidelity of clinical simulation using a cadaveric model.

Methods The tracheas of two fresh frozen unembalmed cadavers were intubated via direct laryngoscopy. Each tracheal tube was connected to a self-inflating bag and a sidestream CO2 detector. The capnograph display was observed and recorded in high-definition video. The cadavers were hand-ventilated with room air until the capnometer reached zero or the waveform approached baseline.

Results A clear capnographic waveform was produced in both cadavers on the first postintubation expiration, simulating the appearances found in the clinical setting. In cadaver one, a consistent capnographic waveform was produced lasting over 100 s. Maximal end-tidal CO2 was 8.5 kPa (65 mm Hg). In cadaver two, a consistent capnographic waveform was produced lasting over 50 s. Maximal end-tidal CO2 was 5.9 kPa (45 mm Hg).

Conclusions We believe this to be the first work to describe and quantify detectable end-tidal capnography in human cadavers. We have demonstrated that tracheal intubation of fresh frozen cadavers can be confirmed by life-like waveform capnography. This requires further validation in a larger sample size.